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Barber Jon Bourne Of Barber Town Worcester, Shares His Thoughts On the Barbering Industry 2017

With multiple barbershops and a position as an NVQ assessor, Jon Bourne from Barbertown in Worcester certainly has a lot on his plate. But he still found the time to catch up with me, and share some of his industry knowledge. Starting his career in a family barbershop, he managed to climb his way through the ranks before eventually setting up his own brand of vintage-inspired barbershops. I asked him about how they’re bringing back some of the best traditions of barbering for a modern gent.  

“We tend to buy old barber chairs – I have some great clients that can service an reupholster them. In general, the shops are just organic, they keep growing. Over time trends change and we adjust the shops accordingly. A lot of the stuff is memorabilia that I myself have collected.” 

This means vintage scooters, old arcade machines and everything in between – and it helps to create what feels like a home from home for Jon no matter which of the three shops he’s working at. But there’s more to Barbertown than good aesthetics – it’s also built on a strong work ethos. 

“We are community barbershops, in locations with local schools and colleges, car dealerships, solicitors, local rugby clubs. Rather than being the standard high street spot, we work within Worcester as part of the community.” 

This community spirit has also meant supporting apprenticeships for young, up and coming barbers. “The apprenticeship model is really important. When I started, you started at the bottom and worked your way up. Ash trays needed emptying, foot rests needed cleaning – it was all about attention to detail. That’s how we start our apprentices off now. It gives them a real grounding, and they become much better barbers.” 

 

Of course, that isn’t the extent of Jon’s work in education: he’s also an end point assessor for students completing their NVQ Level 2. “You spend a couple of hours, watch them do a couple of haircuts. It’s about how they interact with the clients, the consultation, the cleanliness, how they use their tools. And if I think they can do all those things competently then I sign them off.” 

Jon also thinks that there should be more regulation within barbering, with to ensure that barbers who work hard to do things properly aren’t undermined by people with low standards who just want to make a quick buck: “I think every barber should go through some sort of registration process, so the standard is the same. 

“It’s frustrating for the barbers that do everything properly to see others who are unscrupulous, almost doing slave labour, paying cash in hand. It needs to be stamped out and everybody needs to be regulated. We have very sharp instruments, there are infections and if you’re doing everything properly then you don’t have anything to worry about. If you’re serious about your business, why wouldn’t you do it?” 

 

Aside from formal qualifications, Jon brings his exacting standards to the modern hub for barbering education… YouTube. “I just thought we’d post a few videos showing how we cut hair. The feedback has been really positive, I’ve been overwhelmed. People are really interested in traditional styles of barbering.” 

This will naturally lead to people wanting more in-depth training on the Barbertown methods of cutting hair, and the good news is that Jon has plans to start his own academy in the not too distant future: watch this space! 

Another interesting aspect of Barbertown Worcester is their ‘Stay Sharp’ logo, which apparently came about as something of a catchphrase that the barbers would say when working with younger clients. “If I had a pound for every time it was used, I wouldn’t be sat here, I’d be in the Bahamas. It’s just become a bit of a mantra. Now we do T-shirts, various products available from our web shop at barbertown.co.uk. Keep visiting, there’s always going to be more content.” Aside from the shirts, there are all kinds of grooming products available from Jon’s shop; I’d definitely recommend taking a look at barbertown.co.uk. 

 

So, what does a barber like Jon, with now over 30 years of experience under his belt, rate as his best moment in the industry? “When I had the vision of barber town. All of a sudden, I had a new love for barbering. Nobody had things like pinball machines, laptops for people to take orders, Sky Sports back then. We were giving beers away, having that extra service.  

“I took on pretty much the biggest shop on the street. It was a real gamble, I had two very small children. But my wife backed me, and hard work has got us where we are today. I’ve got a great team, too.” 

It’s fair to say the industry has changed a great deal within the 30 years that Jon has been cutting, and one of the newer developments is the introduction of social media. While it’s a new addition to the barber’s toolkit, it’s not to be ignored: Jon and his team have embraced the new technology, and Instagram in particular: 

“On the back of that I’ve met some great people and been offered some great opportunities. It’s a great tool if you use it correctly. We have around 60,000 Instagram followers – I think people just buy into the brand and like what we do. We please ourselves before everyone else as well, which helps.” 

 

It has been great to talk to a barber who represents real professionalism and standards. His closing advice to young barbers reading this now? “Just put the effort and the work in. Go to your local barbershop and get an apprenticeship. Even do it for free for a couple of months if you can afford it. Just get it under your belt.”  

Don’t forget to follow Barbertown on Instagram – and check out the Larry the Barber Man channel too once you’re there! You’ll also find me on YouTube and Facebook; follow for more interviews with top barbers. 

 

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A step by Step Tutorial On How Remove Man Weave By Adrin The Barber

 

A quick and simple tutorial for you today – and an essential for any barber who wants to learn how to apply a man weave safely and effectively. Once you’ve mastered the art of creating a man weave, you also need to be able to remove one properly. Don’t forget to check out Adrin’s video for how to do a man weave/brush wave too. 

 Step one: Start by having your client sit with their head back. Place a towel over their face, covering their eyes.  

Step two: Wearing rubber gloves, spray rubbing alcohol over the whole weave until the entire unit is saturated. 

Step three: Take a fine-tooth comb and start gently pulling back the hair. Go gently and gradually: it should come off quite easily, and your client shouldn’t feel much discomfort. Be sure to check in with them throughout the process so that you can make sure you’re not causing any pain.  

Step four: Use the rubbing alcohol and comb to scrape off any remaining glue and hair from the scalp. 

Step five: Give the scalp a good shampoo to get rid of any leftover adhesive. You can also use a small head massager to get rid of any small flakes of glue that might be leftover. 

 It’s that simple! Make sure that you understand how to remove the hair as well as how to affix it before you start performing this style for your clients. That will ensure that you’re prepared to give them the full service that they may need! This is a very simple process to master and can really help you to upskill as a barber. Good luck: don’t forget to subscribe to Adrin’s Youtube channel as well as mine WWW.BARBERS.TV for more educational videos that will help you learn and refresh your skills.  

A quick and simple tutorial for you today – and an essential for any barber who wants to learn how to apply a man weave safely and effectively. Once you’ve mastered the art of creating a man weave, you also need to be able to remove one properly. Don’t forget to check out my video for how to do a man weave/brush wave too. 

 

Step one: Start by having your client sit with their head back. Place a towel over their face, covering their eyes.  

Step two: Wearing rubber gloves, spray rubbing alcohol over the whole weave until the entire unit is saturated. 

Step three: Take a fine-tooth comb and start gently pulling back the hair. Go gently and gradually: it should come off quite easily, and your client shouldn’t feel much discomfort. Be sure to check in with them throughout the process so that you can make sure you’re not causing any pain.  

Step four: Use the rubbing alcohol and comb to scrape off any remaining glue and hair from the scalp. 

Step five: Give the scalp a good shampoo to get rid of any leftover adhesive. You can also use a small head massager to get rid of any small flakes of glue that might be leftover. 

 

It’s that simple! Make sure that you understand how to remove the hair as well as how to affix it before you start performing this style for your clients. That will ensure that you’re prepared to give them the full service that they may need! This is a very simple process to master and can really help you to upskill as a barber. Good luck: don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more educational videos that will help you learn and refresh your skills.  

 

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How to man weave, brush weave hair on a male clients head – performed by Adrin The Barber

One popular trend that barbers need to be on top of is the man weave. Also known as ‘brush waves’, this is a hair replacement strategy that takes a little time to master but is easy once you know what to do. Whether you’re not sure where to start or you want to enhance your skills, this tutorial is for you! Here are the step by step instructions to help you give your clients excellent man weaves/brush waves. Follow these steps and, with a bit of practice, you can make sure that customers leave your barbershop with a smile!  

What you will need 

There are a few bits of equipment to gather before you start:  

  • An eyeliner pencil 
  • Thin electrical tape  
  • Skin protector 
  • Glue  
  • A wig cap 
  • A hairdryer 

… and, of course, the hair itself! Once you have all of that ready, you can dive straight in. 

 

Step one: Cut the existing hair 

You can really do any haircut that your client asks for at this point, but it’s important to think about what will look good with the weave. Since you’re going to be laying synthetic hair on top of the hair, you won’t be able to cut it any further once you’ve applied the weave. This means that it’s important to guide your client towards a cut that they will be happy with. A mid/high fade tends to work quite well.  

Step two: Mark the hairline 

If your client still has some of their natural hairline then you can use this as a guide. Otherwise, spend some time discussing where they would like the hairline to be. Once you have agreed, mark the line with your eyeliner pencil. Usually, the hairline will have receded to the point that you have to draw this from scratch, but if there is still a natural line to use for guidance it can speed up the process.  

Step three: Prepare the top of the head 

Shave the top of the head. Start at the ‘hairline’ you have drawn, and then move out across the rest of the head, creating a horseshoe shaped line around the skull. Keep this straight all the way around, as the aim is to create a natural looking hairline. Any inconsistency here will make the hair appear lopsided at the end, so make sure your cut is smooth and neat.  

Next, clean the scalp using rubbing alcohol. Make sure your cover the entire scalp, and then apply skin protector. This needs to go anywhere that’s going to have glue – which means you should put it over the whole scalp. Finally, wash off the eyeliner ‘hairline’ until it is only faintly visible, and then place electrical tape along the line.  

Step four: Add glue 

Add glue to the scalp. With the first layer of glue, you don’t need to go all the way to the hairline. Spread it out all over the head and then either let it air dry or use a dryer to speed up the process. Wait until the first layer is completely dry and then add a second layer.  The second layer of glue needs to go all the way to the hairline: apply it in the same way, spreading with a brush. It’s fine to get some of the glue onto the hair at the sides, and if you accidently get glue past the hairline at the front then you can use an old pair of shears to carefully wipe it off.  

Step five: Attach the hair 

Once the glue has started to dry – it should become clear and slightly tacky – it is ready for you to attach the hair. Take one strand at a time and carefully stretch the hair out just a little to create a natural wave formation. Take care to lay it precisely across the head, from front to back, and press gently but firmly into the glue. Lay the middle strand first, and then work out towards one side. It’s important to ensure that all the waves you place are consistent with one and other, as this will ensure that the hair looks natural.   

If necessary, you can place a wave over the natural hair too to make sure that the transition is natural. Once you’ve finished one side, you can go back to the centre and work in the other direction. Again, it is important to make sure that every wave is uniform. Stretching the curls out just the right amount and then laying them in a consistent way can take a bit of practice – so use a mannequin first until you an get it right every time.  

Once you’ve got the practice, this process should only take around ten minutes. It really doesn’t have to be that time consuming! When all the hair is laid, you can trim off the loose ends from the front and back of the head.  

Step six: Dry the hair 

Start by pressing all of the hair into the scalp firmly with the palm of your hand. Then, apply the hairdryer for a few minutes before placing a wig cap over the top of hair. Let the client sit for around ten minutes with the cap over their hair, blow dry over the top for around five minutes, and then let it sit for another ten minutes. This compresses the hair into the glue to help it stick. When you’re done, use scissors to remove the cap when it’s done rather than simply pulling it off your head.  

Step seven: Style 

Use an old pair of clippers that you don’t mind snagging to go over the hair and make it look as natural as possible. As you go over it, you’ll see that the hair starts to blend well with the natural hair and stops looking false. Take the edges down a little bit shorter to help the sides properly. At this stage, take your time – it takes a lot of work to get this far, so you should make sure that you don’t mess it up in the final stages.  

 

Ultimately, practice makes perfect with this kind of style. Put the time in working on a mannequin, and you’ll have the confidence when it comes to actually styling a real client. This is a great thing to master, because it can really transform a person’s look. Let me know how you get on, and don’t forget to subscribe to Adrin’s Youtube channel for new straightforward barbering tutorials or visit my website http://www.larrythebarberman.com for all thing barbering 

By Larry The barber Man

 

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DL Master Barber’s Straight Talking Interview, For The Greater Financial Good Of Young Barbers

Celebrity barber and motivational speaker DL Master Barber is on a mission to make sure that young barbers do the right thing, treat their customers right and ultimately treat their barbershops as what they are: a business. I’m very happy to be amplifying that message for barbers across the world.  

DL hasn’t necessarily had an easy ride to the top: his barbering career saw him earn a lot of money, and then it saw him lose a lot of money. Thanks to this experience, he’s now able to give barbers the jolt of energy that they need to do things differently: 

“When me and my mother came up from Ohio, she had no plan – but she had a purpose, which was to change my life. She just wanted more opportunity for me. Like a lot of us, I graduated from the school of hard knocks. I just wanted something different, to change the financial situation for me and my mother.  

“This made me so passionate about becoming a barber. I didn’t know this passion would move me into a different space and time. Jheri curls came out and barbershops were closing because they weren’t making the transition. And then Hip Hop came along, and the rap artists all had to come to Hollywood and sign their record deals. I was cutting off the Jheri curls and giving them flat tops.  

“So, I end up doing a lot of the New York rappers because they would talk, they’d say there’s this kid who’s nice with the clippers. That catapulted me into meeting more and more rappers. We were having fun, I was cutting hair. I was going to the hotel not knowing who I was cutting because they didn’t have their faces on the album covers.” 

Then ‘Yo! MTV Raps’ started showing music videos and live performances, and everything changed: rappers needed an image to go with their words and beats. DL had already built up the credibility needed to position himself as someone who could help rappers define this style. 

“It changed my life. It changed their life. They needed barbers to create these unique styles for them. Thus, me meeting Tupac Shakur.”  

 

It’s not hard to see, then, how DL was able to create so much success for himself at a very early stage for his career, and it’s hard not to picture him out there living the dream. But it’s not always to cling onto that wealth, especially when you’re young, and barbers can learn as much from the mistakes as from the successes: 

“At the age of 19 I opened up my first shop. At the age of 21 I became a multimillionaire. By the age of 23 I had lost all the money. I didn’t understand how money worked. I knew how to create the money, but I didn’t understand taxes or how to invest the money. I was spending more than I was bringing in. If you don’t know how to deal with your money, you’re gonna lose your money. 60% – 80% of all barbers and hair stylists retire broke, because we don’t understand how money works.” 

The experience of learning this the hard way has made DL determined to give other barbers the education that he missed out on. Helping others in the industry learn how to build their career in the right way has become one of the driving forces in his life. 

“I’m not just speaking it, I’m a living example of it. I want barbers to understand that this is our craft: it’s not just about putting hair on the floor or going to trade shows.” 

As the barbering industry has grown, many more opportunities have opened up. This makes it easier for barbers to network with each other and learn from one and other. But alongside this comes the empty hype, and DL cautions against barbers who turn up at shows or follow their favourite stars on Instagram without actually learning anything. He also warns barbers that trying to copy the work of an inspirational figure isn’t the way to achieve success: you have to be original and find what works for you.  

So how can barbers make this happen? Well, one way is to create standards. “This is what barbers need. Some barbershops have it – a standard of how they do business. You raise your income by raising your value.” Another way is to rectify the mistakes that you’re making. I asked DL to describe the biggest mistake he sees, and explain how it can be fixed: 

“That’s easy. The biggest mistake is education. You have to be educated. You have to be motivated, inspired and empowered to educate yourself. Most barbers want to put hair on the floor but don’t want to educate themselves. Most barbers stay in their neighbourhood, in their shop and think they know everything. If you want to be the best, then you have to educate yourself.” 

And DL is taking a proactive approach in changing this, too – producing content, including books, that barbers can use to educate themselves. These focus on helping barbers create a lifestyle that allows you to save money without struggling. Check out the book, ‘Pocket Game – The Art of Saving Without Saving’ to get all of the secrets. Designed to fit in your back pocket, you can keep this book on hand and get to the wisdom inside when you need it most.  

If you’re not in the mood for reading, then DL also offers mentoring and training sessions where barbers can get. “I did something very different this time: I came up with this idea called the situation room. Wherever I went, I decided to have four barbers come to my room with two problems and came up with a strategic plan to help them overcome these problems. Because a lot of the time, these shows are so big you don’t get the help you really need.  

“I also have a mentoring programme. That’s a six-week course helping people get to their goals. You want to be a platform artist, compete in shows, work with celebrities… that’s what I’ve been doing for twenty+ years. I want to educate, inspire and empower barbers and stylists.” 

 

I’m sure that this video has given you a lot to think about! Perhaps the biggest takeaway is the need to be financially competent as well as good with the clippers to make it as a master barber.  

I think it’s crucial that we bring DL Master Barber to the UK so that British barbers get a chance to learn some of his secrets. I’m going to work hard to help make that happen so that we can get DL on stage, but before that happens, here are the final thoughts that he wants to leave you with: 

“I want you to live your dreams. I want you to stay focused. I want you to believe that you can do what you want to do when you want to do it. There’s an old saying that says ‘if you do what you ought to do, when you ought to do it, then there’ll come a time can do what you want to do when you want to do it.  

“All you’ve got to do is find your ‘it’. And once you find it, what are you going to do with it? Who do you need to bring in to get it? And once you get it, what are you going to do with it? You are a priceless original, so be the best that you can be. And listen to guys like Larry, who are bringing information right into your phone!” 

Follow DL Master Barber on Instagram, and Larry the Barber Man on Instagram or YouTube to get your regular fix of barbering inspo.  

 

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Times Of Paul Taylor Clinch While At Schorem Barbier Rotterdam 2017

Rotterdam’s Schorem Barbier has become an infamous destination for barbers who want to embrace the crazier side of the industry. I was very interested to speak to the British barber Paul Taylor Clinch to find out how he ended up joining their gang – and what it’s really like to work there.  

“Like a lot of people, I was a huge fan. I followed their work online for about two years: as soon as they started doing videos I was watching them on the way to work to feel inspired through the day. I liked their work ethic: work hard, play hard.  

“One day they posted something in Dutch and I was naturally curious. It was basically saying that they were offering a position. Anyone who has seen their documentary will know that Demon Daan got his job there by writing an email that basically said, ‘I’m the guy you’re looking for.’ I wrote my CV, and thought I’d see if lightning can strike in the same place twice. So, it was a professional CV, but at the end I added ‘I’m the guy you’re looking for.’“ 

It clearly resonated, because almost immediately Schorem were in touch to say that they wanted to fly Paul out for a trial. Nervous but excited, Paul jumped on a flight and left to meet his heroes. Once there he spent the day at the shop watching them operate and waiting for his chance to impress with his cutting skills:  

“When it was my turn to do my two models, Rob and Leen came in. And because it was the end of the day, I had the whole team sat on the waiting bench watching. I kid you not, Rob was just sat in the middle leaning forward and squinting at me. Rob checked one side of my cut and Leen checked the other. Luckily they offered me the job there and then.” 

I doubt that luck had much to do with it. Schorem are committed to finding excellent barbers who can maintain their quality. Part of working their means learning to execute 12 specific cuts: these are the looks that Schorem clients expect to walk away with. 

“I was getting into pomps, but I had no idea how the guys at the shop did it. It’s really nice that we all train together: even though we cut what’s on the posters, and that’s one of the golden rules, everyone has different strengths within that. It’s so amazing that we can keep learning off each other.” 

The guys behind Schorem have managed to create a family atmosphere within their crew, and within the barbering community they’re known almost as much for their hijinks as for their cuts. It didn’t take Paul long to realise what he’d gotten into: 

“My first day I got picked up from the airport and Rob said we’re going to do a photo shoot. I thought okay, probably for the website, like a mugshot. I get there, and Gio is pretty much naked, holding some playing cards to cover himself. So I think, this is going to be a weird photo shoot. Rob says to me, ‘we need you to get naked’. I took my shirt off and he says no – naked.” So barbers who want to join the Schorem team can certainly expect a baptism by fire! 

 

A lot of barbers back home in the UK long to jump on a plane and start working at a shop like Schorem. But is it really that different to the traditional shops that we have here?  

“I think the beauty of it is doing the classic haircuts. In England it started to slow down a bit, people were chopping off the pomps. The classic cuts suit everyone. At the shop now, we only do what’s on our posters. So, I get to do the cuts that I love every day. It’s also amazing to learn while I’m there. Rob especially shares his knowledge so openly and so freely.” 

Aside from the cuts themselves, there’s also something special about the boys that Rob recruits to be on his team. “You have to be a little bit loopy to work there. I love the fact that at Schorem, as opposed to a traditional shop, we face away from the mirror. It reminds people that they’re not just there for a haircut, and it also means that we can all talk together throughout the day.” 

“After we’ve done the last cut of the day, we’ll spend an hour just cleaning up with a beer. We like to chill out at the shop: people will pop in just for a beer and a chat. It’s so much more of a hang out. It’s brilliant because when I’m not in the shop I only hear Dutch speech – I have no idea what’s going on around me!” 

Finding a shop that feels more like a family is a great way to make sure that you’re career in barbering is fulfilling; not everyone can work with the barber at Schorem, but anyone can foster this atmosphere in their own shop. I hope Paul’s account inspires you – for more interesting interviews, don’t forget to follow Larry the Barber Man on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.

 

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A Rare Interview With, Barber Gio (The New Kid), Whilst employed At Schorem Barbershop Rotterdam 2017

One from the archives for you today – I’ve dug this interview out from Barber Connect 2017, when I met with Dutch barber Gio to find out more about the infamous salon Schorem Barbier. Gio was able to give me a first-hand account of life at one of the most interesting barbershops out there, as well as the story of his own career.  

“I started twenty years ago, when I was fifteen. I went into hairdressing because I was always colouring my hair and doing crazy things with it. I always had the thought in my mind that I really wanted to gain a lot of experience.” 

Like a lot of barbers, Gio is able to pinpoint the precise moment that he fell in love with cutting hair and realised that it could be a satisfying career.  

“I loved the job so much after my first experience as an apprentice, with an old woman whose hair I needed to wash. She gave me a good tip and it made me so happy as a 15-year-old guy. I fell in love with that feeling of being given something for your talent. 

“As I turned to hairdressing school, I soon saw that there are a lot of women but not many men in the industry. I had a bit of luck because there was a barber at that school teaching scissor over comb, and then clipper over comb. Then I saw people on TV with the classic pomps, James Dean style: pretty much Gentleman cuts. I loved that. I worked on my skills to do these cuts. The classics always come back.” 

 

These classic gentlemen’s cuts have become the defining aesthetic of Schorem, where the barbers work hard to bring back some of the more traditional cuts. This involves hiring talented professionals to execute 12 specific cuts that are featured on the Schorem posters. It’s a tactic that seems to be working for them, and Gio has been lucky enough to see the shop experience intense growth.  

“It’s unbelievable how much this business has grown. It’s amazing, so many talented people. Everyone adds something different, and I think the experience I’ve had with hairdressing helped me be the barber that I am now.” 

Before joining Schorem, Gio lived and worked in Germany for ten years. He began to feel restless and wanted to return to Holland – but he also wanted to find something that would give him purpose once he got there. “I wanted a good thing, something where I could still learn. To work with someone that I could really look up to. That’s my drive. I thought I’d just send a message and see if there’s a spot at Schorem. I got talking with one of their original crew members and had such a strong, passionate conversation. I applied for a job, wrote a letter to Leen and started emailing every week.” 

It took a few weeks, but ultimately Gio’s persistence paid off and he was able to combine his return to Holland with an exciting new job.  

“History was made for me, and now I’m almost two and a half years at Schorem. Every day is a new day, and every day is a good day. I’ve been there in hectic times, with a waiting line from 30-60 people out the front of the door. Especially in the summer months, it’s crazy.  

“It’s a kind of pressure, but it’s also a nice thing. Right now, two and a half years later, you can see that the barbershop has met the vision of what they wanted. It’s what a barbershop should be, without the hype. 

“They were there at the right time, had a load of luck and did a real good job for everybody. Now everybody gets a piece of the pie and we’re all enjoying it. It’s something that I’m proud to be a part of: I can walk with a smile.” 

 

For some barbers it might be difficult to imagine leaving a shop like Schorem, but for Gio it doesn’t represent the limits of his ambition. “I’m not going to be old in Schorem: this is not my end station. I’ve always been honest about that. I think there will be a time in my life when I want to move on, grow old and look back.” 

Working at Schorem will certainly give Gio a lot to reflect back on once he’s old and grey; in many ways, Schorem is part of a transformative movement in barbering. It’s about a lot more than bringing back classic cuts: it’s about providing a sense of community and celebrating the craft of barbering. 

Want to learn more about Schorem?  Read about their work, their products and their training on the website – or view Bertus and Leen’s channel ‘Project X’ for an educational series featuring 12 of the world’s top barbers. You can also get more tips and tricks from the huge range of barbers featured on my page: just follow Larry the Barber Man on Instagram, YouTube and Facebook.

 

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Interview With Barber Joth Davies Of Savills Barbershop Sheffield, At Barber Connect 2017

Bringing the best traditions of British barbering into the modern age is no mean feat, but for Joth Davies it’s the foundation of a hugely successful brand. With his high-end barbershop Savills to look after, as well as his Copacetic product line, the Savills Academy and a Wahl ambassadorship, he’s a busy man – so I felt very lucky to grab 30 minutes with him at the 2017 Barber Connect. We start by talking about his beautiful shop:
“It’s always been my vision from very early on. I loved that 1920s era: the architecture, the clothing and especially the haircuts. I was always trying to turn the shops that I had into this vision. I say this a lot, but when I walk out of the shop of an evening and I turn to lock the door I look back and I think yeah, this is what I always wanted.”

It’s easy for barbershop owners to fall into the trap of constantly refitting their shop, eager to keep up with the latest trends. But while this might be a good way to stay contemporary, Joth has proven that it’s completely unnecessary if you decide to go for something classic and timeless.
“The shop we have now is never going to change. It’s just going to get better with age.”

One of the more recent additions to Joth’s roster of achievements is his work as a Wahl ambassador. I asked him to explain how this came about: “I did some work for Wahl a long time ago, and then I was out of hairdressing for a long time with a shoulder industry. Now with Savills, Simon (Shaw – Creative Director of Wahl) really liked what we were doing and invited me to do a few guest spots on their stage. I’ve got a massive admiration for Simon and how he operates. The people he picks aren’t always the obvious people, and we just really get on.

“Recently Simon approached me about a programme that they’re rolling out and asked me if I’d be interested in working on it with them. I jumped on it – partly because I love educating, but also because I jut love Wahl clippers. They were the first pair of clippers I ever owned”.
This led to Joth taking the prestigious title of Principle Educator for Men’s Method in the UK. This puts him at the front of an interesting educational process designed to ensure that barbers are ready to hit the barbershop floor running once they finish their training.
“Wahl have created a package that provides DVDs and books as well as clippers, gowns and posters to help create a barbering section within the college. It teaches nine different haircuts using step-by-step DVDs but also online materials. My job is to train the trainers. I go in and do two days training on the cuts, but also the ideology and the history of Wahl. We also assess the colleges to make sure they’re delivering it properly.”

If you love the work that Joth is doing at Savills, then you’re also sure to enjoy his range of hair products, Copacetic. “It just seemed like the next thing for us to do. I started creating things that I wanted as a barber, accoutrements that could help me in my job. Other barbers were saying that they would want them, so that popularity drove us to mass produce them. Hair products seemed like the natural next thing.

“I was really struggling with what to call them though. But once I worked out how I wanted to market it, and how I wanted them to look it all became really easy. I wanted it to look like something you’ve found at the back of your Grandad’s bathroom cabinet, with a little bit of dust on the top. Then I came across this website devoted to 1920s slang words. A lot of them we use now, like the bee’s knees – slang that was developed in the speakeasy back then. I needed something that hadn’t already been taken by other brands. I found this term, ‘Copacetic’. It means ‘everything’s okay.’”

So what products can you expect from the Copacetic range? They have a fantastic pomade, as well as cream, a matte clay and a paste to suit different client needs. These products help to support those classic hair cuts that Joth specialises in, as well as some of the more contemporary styles. On top of that there are accoutrements such as tool rolls and aprons to add to your barbering kit – all with the same precision to detail and excellent finish.

Before letting Joth slip away, I had to find out just a little bit about the Savills Academy. Joth ‘s very specific approach to barbering has meant that other professionals have been eager to get a piece of his knowledge: “People were asking me to put out a DVD, or a YouTube video, or some training in the shop. So I thought, why not just make an academy? I pinch myself now at how far people are travelling just to spend two or three days in the shop. We have people coming from Australia, New Zealand, all over Europe… it’s crazy.

“People love the fact that it’s done in the shop, alongside the working barbers. But what we teach is nothing ground-breaking! It’s nothing that hasn’t been done for hundreds of years, really. But it is a method that I’ve developed through working with lots of different people over the year. We also do everything on live models.”

It’s always a pleasure to speak to a barber as modest and insightful as Joth is. These core elements of his personality are summed up by the final answer he gives me, when I ask what advice he has for other aspiring master barbers:
“Run! There isn’t an answer for that from me, really, because I never intended any of this to happen. I started with a little three chair barbershop and I was happy with that. And if I was still cutting in their everyday, I’d still be happy. It’s all happened by accident. If I’d tried to do it I just don’t think it ever would have happened the way it did.
“It’s happened organically. Because we, as barbers and hairdressers, are very creative so I’m always taking on more projects. I’d just say you’ve got to love what you do. Because if you’re passionate about it, it will happen organically.”

Don’t forget to follow @LarrytheBarberMan on Instagram, YouTube and Facebook to meet more creative professional barbers just like Joth, and hear the stories that brought them to the top.

 

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Kevin Luchmun Interviews, Charlie Cullen Head Of Men’s Education At Toni & Guy

Not one but two fantastic barbering/hairdressing talents for you today: in this interview, the inimitable Kevin Luchmun stepped behind the camera to take on the role of interviewer. In the chair is Toni & Guy International Artistic Director Charlie Cullen, ready to give an insight into his career…

KL: How long have you been hairdressing for and where did the journey start?

CC: I’ve been a hairdresser for almost fifteen years, I started when I was 16. Initially you start your basic hairdressing career: learning women’s haircuts, blow-drying. For me though, it was when I started to learn men’s hairdressing that I realised this was the thing that I wanted to focus on.

KL: Where did the journey start with Toni & Guy and what is your role here?

CC: I started from the bottom like anyone, doing an apprenticeship in a small salon on the outskirts of London – it was a Toni & Guy. It was about a year into working there that I started to go to their academy one day a week to learn more skills. I started off as an assistant, then worked as a stylist in that salon gaining experience.

That was really until I felt that I wanted to work into London, somewhere that would test me and push my career to higher places. I started working in Toni & Guy in Sloane Square, and did some training to become an art director which takes a lot of time and a lot of evening work. Eventually, though, I became an educator: it had always been a dream of mine.

I really had a passion to specialise in men’s hairdressing, and to fly that flag – although I do now teach men’s and women’s hair.

KL: Now you head up the men’s course within the academy and globally, so can you tell us a little bit about these courses and what makes them different?

CC: I think it’s good for the industry that there are a lot of people out there who want to educate, but also that those same people are open to education themselves. It would be naïve to think that what we do is the only thing that’s out there.

I feel that what we do well is our three-day contemporary men’s cutting course – it’s not a barbering course, although we do deliver elements of barbering. It’s about bringing the student in with whatever level of experience and whatever they want to focus on. We’ll tailor the course to the individual and focus on all the principles of men’s hairdressing. When someone wants to learn something in particular, we try our best to deliver that for them.

KL: At the moment there is a fusion of barbering and men’s hairdressing happening. Could you tell us a little bit about the difference between the two, and where you’d say you specialise?

CC: I suppose it really comes down to where you start your career. My foundation is hairdressing: I think that gives me a good understanding of sectioning hair, the importance of it and the real technical aspect of hairdressing. I try to bring that into men’s hairdressing in a simple way: you don’t want to overcomplicate men’s hair.

What we see at the moment is a lot of barbers, especially from outside Europe, who are unbelievable at fading but want to learn classic graduation through fingers, scissor over comb, sectioning, hand position. They don’t necessarily have that in their initial training – not to say that this is the case for all barbers.

At the same time, a lot of British hairdressers want to learn how to skin fade or do tapering techniques. It works well for us to take the best elements from each one so that you deliver a haircut that has the feeling and technique of a barbering cut but also the hairdressing texture.

KL: Why do you enjoy educating? What is it about that side of things that makes you want to get up on stage?

CC: It’s not for everyone, and I don’t think that it’s a bad thing if you don’t decide to educate. Some people go into the management side of things or become a business owner. But I educate for the feeling of being able to take someone and show them a new skill. As hairdressers we work on appreciation, and when someone appreciates a wicked haircut that you’ve done, or you’ve taught a student and you can see their appreciation that’s great.

It’s also given me the chance to travel the world. British barbering is so big at the moment that it’s sort of dominating Europe and starting to travel the rest of the world. I never dreamt as a 16-year-old hairdresser in Uxbridge that I’d be going to do haircuts on stage in South Korea.

KL: Finally, while we’re here at Salon International and there’s a lot of inspiration happening across the show, do you have any top tips or advice to give to young people trying to move towards the stage?

CC: Take the opportunities. There are a lot of companies out there looking for educators, but you’ve also got to be true to yourself. Eventually, if you work hard, you’ll get noticed and you’ll get rewarded. So put that dedication in to be good at your job.

Salon International is a perfect place because you can see lots of platform artists and how they deliver things. That sets the bar. But you do you: I wouldn’t do something that wasn’t my taste or strength. As long as you’re true to yourself, you’re going to get noticed eventually.

I’d like to say a huge thank you to both Kevin Luchmun and Charlie Cullen for sitting down and recording this excellent interview – I’m sure that Charlie’s words will help to inspire many barbers reading this or watching the clip. Don’t forget to follow Larry the Barber Man on all of your favourite social media channels: regular interviews shared to Instagram, YouTube and Facebook to help you perfect your craft.

 

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Atila The Barber Shares, His Inspirational Barbering Story…

Educator, product founder, youtuber and motivational speaker – all of this, on top of being a barber, means that Attila is a busy man indeed. But that’s the way he likes it, as I found out when I visited him at his barbershop in North London. 

“When I was young, I hung around with the wrong people. I grew up in Tottenham and I was always in the wrong place at the wrong time. I got arrested numerous times and was in and out of prison at one point.” Atila talks about feeling like a ‘yo-yo’, dropping in and out of employment, but also turning to law-breaking activities. It wasn’t until he discovered barbering that things started to change.  

“I tried it, but I didn’t have belief in myself and I started doing the wrong stuff again. I was going up and down, up and down. I thought I have to pick up my clippers again. I picked up my clippers and started my own mobile business: Atila’s Mobile Barbering. 

“Eventually I found a shop to work in, but I wasn’t good enough. All I could do was fades. I wanted to learn more about scissors and hairdressing. So, I decided to work and settled for £40 per week. After 3-4 months I got the opportunity to take 50% of each haircut. My passion for barbering started growing.” 

Not the smoothest transition into barbering – but it’s this fragile start that makes Atila’s barbering journey all the more compelling. After getting the taste for barbering, he decided to start looking for other opportunities that would help him spread his wings: 

“I saw a shop called Smith’s Hair Studio, full of guys like me. I thought I can be myself, not have to hide my identity. I was a free man. I met a great team and we’ve grown as a family. It gave me a chance to get better at my craft while my passion for barbering grew.” 

 

Amongst his peers, Atila is known as an advocate for positive thinking and the laws of attraction. He explains how this came to be such an important part of his life:  

“I’ll tell you the truth: I had a nervous breakdown at the age of 23. I got into a lot of debt and I was under a lot of stress. So I started developing and educating myself. I listened to motivational speakers, like Eckhart Tolle and Rhonda Byrne, who I still look up to now. Recently I’ve read The Power of Now, The Secret. I just wanted to feed myself with positivity. 

“Every morning I would listen to a motivation speaker, and every evening before I went to bed. This would get me through the day. If I had more negative thoughts throughout the day, then I would listen to more.”  

Atila decided that other barbers could benefit from this motivation, especially in the UK where the typical educational talk is more focussed on cutting than on philosophy. He decided to conquer his nerves and become an educator himself.  

“The first show I ever went to was Barber Connect. I made a few connections there and then went to a few more shows. I met up with Adam Sloan and MHFed – they liked my positivity and offered me a showcase. I was getting my work out there and I wanted to do it more. I got the opportunity to cut on stage, and then more work started coming my way. In 2017, there wasn’t a single show I missed out on.” 

Networking and building strong relationships in this way is a really good option for barbers who simply want to get there name out there. By being authentic and positive when around other barbers, you can quickly become known as a bright voice within the community.  

 

Atila really emphasizes the importance of barbering education and gives a big shout out to Ego Barbers and Stell in particular for continuing to give him exceptional education under the Kings of Tomorrow programme. If you want to hear more about the Ego Barbers team then check out this video from back in 2016. The most important point here is that even barbers who offer their own education need to continue learning from other masters. 

In Atila’s own educational programme, he’ll be showing barbers how to make more money behind the chair: offering services and connecting with clients can help you earn more and bring even more clients into the shop. Barbers can also go to Atila to find out more about creating the sharpest cuts.  

“I specialise in creating really sharp, clean haircuts. I’m obsessed with it. If I take a picture of a haircut and it’s not quite right then I’ll delete it, go back to the cut and do it again. I’m also able to do a really fast, clean fade. I can fade in 8-10 minutes and then tidy it up afterwards.” By turning to a barber with great skills as well as an understanding of the service side of the industry, you can really start to develop a professional barbering career.  

 

Aside from education, Atila has been busy creating his own product line. “I started by creating a logo, and then wanted to do something with it. I made a few t shirts and hats that I could wear to shows to get my name out there. Then very recently I began to create a whole product line: beard oil, matte clays, pomades, sea salt sprays and cologne. I start with a sample, and if my clients like it then I continue to produce it.”  

At the moment, these are only available to barbers in Atila’s own shop. However, there are plans to open up a new website and take products to shows so that other barbers can resell in their own shop: watch this space. He also has an upcoming YouTube series, with plans to release a video every two weeks covering different haircuts and cutting techniques.  

 

As somebody known for their positive energy, I’m interested to know what positive change Atilla would like to see come to the barbering industry. “I see a lot of observers: people just watching and not speaking. I think we should all get together and that way we can make this happen. It’s a competition out here now – we need to start working together instead.” 

Atila also champions a fierce work ethic: sleeping just five hours a day, he uses the rest of his time to develop both is technical skills and his mental strength. “The more you develop yourself, the more you’re going to want. Watch motivational speakers and develop yourselves: these are the things that got me to where I am today. I believe the secret to success is getting up early and going to bed late.” 

This attitude has certainly brought Attila a long way over the past few years, and I ask him to let us know where it’s going to take him next: “I’ve got a plan to have shops abroad. I want to take my craft to other places and motivate them as well. I might even move away from cutting hair and just become a speaker. My main goal is to speak internationally and inspire barbers all over the world”. 

Keep up to speed with the latest developments on Atila’s Instagram account @atilathebarber, and follow @larrythebarberman to make sure you never miss an interview! You can also subscribe to my channel on YouTube or follow me on Facebook for more updates.

 

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Barber Patty Cuts: Shares His Secrets, How He Achieve The Cuts That He Does, Plus How To Dominate Instagram

 

Patty Cuts is easily recognisable as one of Florida’s most talented rising stars – he boasts over 118k followers on Instagram, a sponsorship deal with BaByliss and several prestigious barbering awards. All of which puts him in a great position to help out other barbers who may be wondering how to start or where to go next.

Turn the clock back just a few years, though, and you’ll find a very different story. “At twelve years old, where I’m from in Philadelphia, everybody likes to look sharp. I didn’t have money to get cut all the time, so I started on my own hair. By the age of 16, 17 I was cutting up the whole neighbourhood.

“The only thing was, I never thought it could be a lifelong career. I thought I had to go to college, but I was not a good student. I had no passion for it, but I got through four years. Then in my fourth year, my Dad died – he committed suicide. My life got completely shaken up, and I went down the road of drugs and alcohol for pretty much the next year. I was miserable. So, I packed up all my stuff and moved to Florida, with a plan to become a lifeguard on the beach. This is about four and a half years ago: I was completely miserable.”

Delivering pizzas and feeling like he’d hit a dead end, it’s easy to see why Patty was starting to lose hope. “I like to tell this story where I made a sharp turn delivering one day and buffalo sauce spilled all over my back seat and that was it. I pulled over to the side of the road and made a decision that the next day I would go and enrol in barber school.”

It’s important to remember that unlike many UK barbers who are able to learn on the job, barbers in America need to be licensed: in Florida, that meant 1200 hours of barber school. “They do a lot of different stuff in barber school – but in the second half you get to cut people’s hair. So, I toughed out the first 600 hours and then got to cut hair on the floor.”

For a full-time learner, this takes around a year to complete, with a written exam at the end. The time commitment is worth it though, because it lets barbers get set up in a proper barbershop: for Patty, the next stop was a shop “right in the middle of the hood”, where he had to very quickly pick up new skills cutting textured hair – undoubtedly something which will have played into his more recent success winning Barbercon 2017’s Best Fades of the Year award!

Aside from cutting phenomenal haircuts, Patty Cuts has built up his brand by growing his social media following at an extraordinarily fast rate. This is an important skill for any hair professional who wants to become respected beyond their local community. “I like to talk about what I did wrong first. On Instagram I expected nice cuts to be enough – I was getting frustrated. That’s because I was doing it wrong. I was taking pictures with my old cell phone, I wanted results without putting in the work.

“Eventually I bought myself a camera. That’s when it all changed. I got a nice portrait lens – it all changed for me. My cuts were the same, but presentation was completely different. As I keep going up, I get better with photography because I study that as well. Kevin Luchmun is one of my inspirations, I’ll ask him questions.

“There’s also a time strategy, and a thought process about what I write in my captions, what hashtags people are searching. So, there’s a lot of strategy and kind of a marketing mind behind posting these pictures.”

Getting to grips with posting professionally allowed Patty to promote a unique style, the X-ray part. He originally shared as part of a competition started by Lee from Barbershop Connect, who asked barbers to have a go at crafting a great new look. “It’s two little slashes, but instead of carving them out, you leave it dark and cut around it. I call it the X-ray Part, because it’s kind of the negative of a picture. It just caught on – people started doing it and tagging me in it. I won Lee’s competition, and that was a good break for my social media.”

Patty also has some exciting educational projects in the works, and plans to work with fellow educator and BaByliss ambassador Sofie to produce a course that’s a little bit different. “We’ve discussed doing a three-part class. The first part would be cutting, and we would go about doing our different cuts – she is phenomenal at fading. The second part would be photography, and how to portray images of your cut in a cool, artistic way. Then the third thing would be videography.”

Being able to learn this trio of skills from such a talented barbering duo would certainly be a great opportunity for any barber who wants to show-off their work more effectively. You’ll also get the opportunity to pick up some of Patty and Sofie’s advice – and in closing, I ask Patty to share his most essential tips:
“Never stop learning. I will still take classes, I’ll still learn how to do something better. Right now I’m working on shear work. So, whether you’re accomplished or up and coming, take a class that comes up. And then secondly, if you’re not getting recognised then you probably need to do something different. Get out and meet people. Build relationships with awesome people!”

 

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