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Hair Clippers: The Ultimate Guide To Powering Any Clipper Any Where In The World Correctly( 240v to 110v)

The objective of this tutorial is to show you how to power your clippers seamlessly in your country. But let’s get started with a quick science lesson to give you the basics of voltage, currents and frequency. With an understanding of these three things, you’ll have the ability to read any label on any clipper and then take the correct action to get that clipper working without any issues.

Voltage: When we want to power clippers in countries across Europe and South America, the voltage supplied will be anywhere between 220V and 240V. All of these voltages are compatible, which means that you can safely and effectively power a 220 or 230v clipper from a 240v socket or visa versa.

Current: In almost all cases, the current that is passed into the clippers is what’s known as an alternating current (AC). This means that the current is passed back and forth from positive to negative and so on. In simpler terms, you can think of it as rapidly turning on and off, multiple times per second.

Frequency: The final element to be aware of is frequency. Frequency is the number of cycles between on and off per second, referred to as hertz. In the UK, the frequency is 50Hz, which means that there are 50 cycles per second. Of course, because the electricity is moving so quickly, it creates the illusion that there is a constant supply of energy. In America, the typical voltage is 120v and the frequency is 60Hz.

 

Now let’s talk about some of the different tools that are available for helping you with powering your clipper. The first is a step down transformer – this takes the voltage from 240 volts down to 110 volts. It delivers a continuous frequency of 50Hertz. The second thing is an adapter which, in simplistic terms, is a plug changer. You use the adapter to ensure that the plug on your clipper fits into the power outlet. There is no voltage change or frequency change taking place.

The final device is the frequency 60Hz converter. This device takes the voltage down from 220-240v to 110-120v and lifts the frequency from 50Hz to 60Hz. That allows your clippers to run seamlessly. With these three devices, you can power more or less any hair clipper from anywhere in the world. To show you how, I’m going to talk you through a range of different popular tools.

 

Andis Pro Alloy

Let’s start simply with the Andis Pro Alloy, a UK hair clipper. First and foremost, you’ll want to turn it over and check the specifications: this requires 230 volts and 50Hz. As I mentioned before, all voltage outputs between 220 and 240 will be fine. This means that you can simply plug the clipper in and go.

 

Wahl Super Taper

Slightly more complicated is powering the European version of the Wahl Super Taper. Once again, check the specifications – again, this shows that you’ll need 230 volts and 50Hz. The only complication here is the fact that it has a European plug, which won’t go into a UK power outlet. This means that we’ll need the adapter – and you should be able to buy an adapter for whatever type of socket used in your own country when necessary.

 

Andis Fade Master

With the Andis Fade Master things are slightly different: checking the specifications I can see that this clipper needs 120 volts of power with a 60Hz cycle. This means that we need to take the voltage down to stop the clipper from blowing up whilst also, ideally, bringing the frequency up.

One option would be to use the standard transformer. This will bring the voltage down, whilst still giving a 50Hz frequency. But if you do that, you’re going to hear a terrible noise coming from your clipper – check out the video to see exactly what I mean. That’s because the Fade Master has a magnetic motor, making it entirely dependent on receiving the right frequency. The alternative is to use the Frequency 60Hz converter. This will take the voltage down to 120, whilst also lifting the frequency, causing the Fade Master to run nice and smoothly, just as if you were running it from America: check out the video to see the difference for yourself!

 

Cordless Trimmers and Clippers

When you’re powering cordless clippers, things are slightly different. The first thing to be aware of is the fact that cordless clippers are not frequency dependent. However, you still need to be careful to ensure that you are powering them correctly.

With a Wahl Cordless Clipper, you have a strict power requirement of 120 volts. This means that you need to use a standard transformer to bring the voltage down – you can buy one which also acts as a UK to US adapter. This will charge the clipper without risk of it blowing up.

With an Andis Cordless Trimmer such as the Slimline Pro Li, the label tells you that it can run on a power supply with 100-240 volts on 50 or 60Hz. This is great because it means that you can run it successfully on any power supply across the world so long as you have the correct plug adapter. It’s also perfectly fine to still use the transformer if this is the only adapter that you have. Again, that will allow you to charge you Slimline Pro Li safely and effectively.

 

I hope you found this demonstration helpful! If you do have any questions, feel free to leave a comment or get in touch. The most important thing is that, now you can read the clipper’s label clearly yourself, you’ll be able to understand what any clipper’s power requirements are.

You can also take a look at this older video if you’d like to understand more about why some US clippers make that terrible racket when not powered correctly – and don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for even more great tips.

 

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Barber: Harry Pirate’s Inspirational Interview With Larry The Barber

From one cutthroat business to another, Harry Pirate has been a chef and a music producer in past lives – but now he’s found his calling as a barber, and the proud owner of the Pirate Barbershop in Bromley. In this interview, he tells me about how his career developed and gives advice for the next generation of barbers.

After bumping into Harry Pirate on a few different occasions, I decided it was time to get to know this passionate barber a little better. Although he has only been barbering professionally for around 3 years, he’s been cutting hair since he was 17 – although it took a few career changes before he realised that this was what he wanted to do with his life:
“So I’m a qualified chef, and I worked in all the big restaurants in town – that got really stressful and I hated it in the end, I was stressed out all the time. So I got out of that, and worked in the music industry for around 6 years as a producer, doing a lot of different stuff with a lot of affiliated musicians. I enjoyed it at first, but it felt like I was getting to a point where I was giving my whole heart to people and getting nothing back. The money dried up because more and more people were producing cheap music, and I also found that the industry in general is very dog eat dog, with a lot of fake people. I’m not that guy, so I walked away from it and never looked back”.
Having been cutting hair backstage while touring as a music producer, this was already something that Harry loved, so it seemed like the logical next step: “A, I could make more money. B, I was meeting different people every day, not stuck in the same circles of people who are just out for themselves. And C, it made me happy”. After losing inspiration with his music, this became Harry’s new outlet, and he knew that he needed to do it properly. This led Harry to go for professional qualifications at the excellent London School of Barbering.
As many of you will know, I was recently lucky enough to experience the London School of Barbering’s shaving course, and Harry seems to have had a similarly excellent experience there:
“I had a great time, and that’s where I met H, my shop manager too. I haven’t looked back. I found out I’d picked up so many bad habits; they give you a great base and after that when you go out to a barbershop you do fall back into those bad habits but with an educated mind – so you can turn bad habits into good habits. They turned me from being a barber that loved what I was doing, to being a barber that loved what I was doing”.
He adds that YouTube can also be a great tool for learning, and there are plenty of educational videos out there including everything from information about clippers to tutorials for perfecting a particular technique. If you’re interested in self-taught barbering, Harry has a video outlining some of his favourite educational YouTubers out there – and don’t forget to check out my Barbers.TV YouTube channel for tips and tricks.
On Board the Pirate Ship
Before opening the Pirate Barbershop, Harry was working at Ruffians – but although he has nothing but good things to say about the shop and his time there, it also led him to realise that he needed to do things his own way:
“It’s a great barbershop, love what they do, but it wasn’t my style of barbering, it’s more of a high-end men’s salon. “Here it’s a barbershop, it’s a man-cave. There is swearing, there is rap music playing, there are people drinking beer – it’s a pirate ship and we love it. For me personally, and my style of barbering I needed to get away and do my own thing. We’re a concept barbers, so it’s a one price service. It may be a little bit more expensive, but you get ten times more than at other barbershops in the area.”
No wonder, then, that the shop is already thriving – both with walk-ins off the street and, predominantly, with repeat clients, the true sign that any barbershop is succeeding! They’ve also been building up a range of Pirate products, with an impressive list that includes everything from beard oils and moustache toffees to hand-made soap and bristle bubbles, as well as a new cologne that is just hitting the shelves.
Harry tells me that he is trying to “create a brand rather than just a barbershop”, and he’s also doing this by running a YouTube channel which you can find here. Like me, he loves talking about clippers and gear, sharing reviews that will help other barbers find the right tools for their style of clippers. You’ll also find vlogs, as well as plenty of advice for up and coming barbers; Harry tells me that it’s geared towards people who want to get into barbering but are wondering where to start or how to improve.
Before I leave you with Harry’s words of wisdom for barbers who are new to the trade, I have to take a brief moment to share some of the gear that he loves to use – I never miss an opportunity to talk clippers, after all! After initially using Wahl tools such as the detailer and the magic clip cordless, Harry has found that he much prefers working with Andis clippers:
“Wahl stuff is great and you can do a sick fade, but I prefer Andis now: the guard system is a game changer, especially the old double magnetic guards, they’re brilliant. You can go really high with them, get a lovely transition. I found with the Wahl stuff that the fades weren’t as stretched as they can be. Personally, for my style of barbering, the Andis clippers do it – I also think the build quality is a lot better.” His kit includes the Balding Clipper, Fade Masters and Pro Foil clippers as well as a Blackout clipper and the Pro Mate Precision – both of which I was happy to pass on to Harry as a token of my appreciation for recording this great interview! The American clippers in this list are powered by my frequency 60hz converter, so if you want to try them out then that might be the missing piece of the puzzle: a converter which can power US clippers without any trouble.

So, as promised here is Harry Pirate’s excellent advice for upping your barbering game. As always, you can follow me on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook for more great content – in the meantime, take note of Harry’s wise words and put them into practice whenever you can:
“Don’t step on screws… don’t get electrocuted daily… don’t break your hand… but all jokes aside just work hard, save up money, get a loan if you need to – make it happen, and you will make money. Sort your finances out and if you want a shop just make it happen. I had a great job at Ruffians, I was at one of the greatest shops in the country: I didn’t have bundles of cash, but I made it happen. Grab it and run with it.”

 

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Barbering Educator: Vishal of VBD Education, Talks Barbering

Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care – a quote from Teddy Roosevelt that is also used by VBD Education creator, Vishal Baharani.

Vishal got his start as a barber when he was twenty-one years old, but like many other greats, did not have much of an interest in barbering or hairdressing. His early life was actually filled more with music, such as playing the cello – it would be his love for music that would coincidentally transition from musical art to visual art in the way of his styles, cuts and love for the barber life.

 

Noticeably, Vishal also wears quite a few tattoos and has several members in his family that are dedicated tattoo artists, and he wears his tattoos with pride. “A friend gave me my first tattoo at fifteen years of age – they’re a reflection of my journey, a temple to hold all of my values.” He points out a few and explains them to me: “Familia is family, there is “Love” here,” he then points to his forehead, “and this is Sanskrit. It means “love and be loved”. It is clear that tattoos play a huge role in his style and life. His clippers even come decorated with tattoos; his signature, of sorts.

 

Going through his education and training to become a barber, he would also discover his love for education. “Education is the most important thing for a person to have. Education is the difference between humans and animals, it plays a big part in how we treat people,” he explains. Vishal also elaborates that he did seminars in school for other students while attending. From there, he tells me, he knew that teaching was an absolute must in his life and that decision would ultimately lead to the academy that has changed thousands of lives, VBD Education.

 

VBD Education has done tours throughout Europe, and has plans on heading to Argentina as well as the states at some point in the near future. After experiencing a seminar for myself, I can definitely see what so many students have been getting out of it. He tells me that a big influence on how he works was the fact that he was trained by people from the United States in barbering. In fact, he expresses that he thinks it is the best country for the idea of barber life, and his choice in clippers clearly reflects that sentiment! Wielding his Oster Model 10 and a Wahl Five Senior typically, Vishal laughs and admits, “I can use European clippers, but I just don’t like to. Comparing them to the American models, you can see a big difference and it just feels more natural.”

 

During the seminar I attended, Vishal was kind enough to do his demonstrations alongside Paul Hewitt, AONO and Shane Nesbitt, Shane’s Barber Shop, using the Frequency 60hz to power his American clippers in the Spanish academy. “My experience was quite good. Technology can adapt any kind of clipper to my journeys, and it’s something I can use to keep delivering classic haircuts”. He’s equally pleased about Paul and Shane being on board, commenting on how excited he is that they think similarly to him and hold a lot of the same values. “It’s about the message, not the messenger,” Vishal states. “I want to get out there and spread these ideas and values of barber life and having Shane and Paul on board has just taken it to an all new level”.

 

So, what words does he impart with for people who might on the fence about attending a VBD Education seminar or master class? “We reassure signing on by showing that you can come to a VBD seminar, and it will open up a new way to see what barbering really is: the values, history, etc., so you can feel more confident. Passion for barbering, when you have knowledge, you have options, when you have options, you can choose “. From a man who balances a keen understanding of barbering, fashion and trends, the value in attendance is evident. One of the biggest advantage that is often raved about is how Vishal teaches not only the right skills and mindset a barber should have, but also brings in fashion as a way to help them see the perspective of the customer and how to reach them on a meaningful level.

 

If anyone is on the fence, you shouldn’t be. With Shane and Paul on hand, Vishal’s VBD Education tour is aiming to reach more people than ever and bring about a great new sense of what it means to be part of the barber life.

 

If you enjoyed this interview then don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, follow me on Instagram, and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email Larry at info@larrythebarberman.com – The Frequency60hz defied what was a set cultural problem in the barbering industry; perhaps the future for barbers is in thinking outside the box.

 

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Groom Room Barber Shop Owner Mark Talks Principles Of Barbering Success

In the deep southwest of Torquay, I sit down to talk with the Viking-bearded Mark of The Groom Room Barbershop about his beginnings, his adventures and plans for the future. Mark started out like many barbers do – sweeping up hair in a salon on Saturdays. It was in the same salon as he is in now that he actually got his start, with a little help from a cousin that worked as a hairdresser as well. The salon was kept busy at the time from all of the bleaches and highlights in demand, as he puts it, and Mark got his training in house.

 

“I wasn’t inclined to do the four year apprenticeship,” he answers when I ask about formal training. “I instead went to London and took a barbering course with Alan D in London.” He eventually found his way to Torquay in an, as he puts it, sort of round-the-world trip with his partner to Australia and a stop off in New Zealand as well.

 

The style of the shop, as Mark describes it, is ever-evolving. “It has grown over the years. It was originally more to the customer’s expectations, but as time went on we kept up with the trends and the styles. It’s always an ongoing process.”

I ask him about the business he generates with his prices being on the higher side for his area and how he manages to accomplish it. “It’s about reading customers and what they are looking for. It’s constantly changing and developing so that customers get more for their service – it’s really a graduating thing. You have to set your price point, basically, but then you have to be able to deliver at that level. Charge a little more and stand out from the crowd – always deliver on that promise.” Wise words from a man who considers his most satisfying moment in barbering the moments each day when his client leaves with a smile on their face, looking good and knowing that they are coming back.

 

In line with some other barbers, Mark talks about the styles in the southwest as hanging on to very short, kept hair – lots of fades, though not skin tight anymore. He suspects that this will continue through the new year until the summer when, as he puts it, people are more open to change. As with a few of my other interviews in the past, he has a sneaking suspicion that longer hair will be making a comeback (so keep an eye out!).

 

Earlier, Mark quoted the importance of in-house training. “We do it here, and I feel it is important for consistency and so everyone is on the same page.” When asked if he had considered any opportunities to pass on his knowledge to other up and coming barbers, Mark told me: “Like I said, we do that here – I think everyone should do in-house training, to be honest – but I have gone to some local salons and colleges and have done some teaching. As for actively seeking education opportunities out, I’m not at this time but if anyone wants to get in touch with me, I’d be more than happy to help.” You heard it here, folks!

For anyone jealous of his Viking-beard, The Groom Room does have a line of beard oils for the discerning gentleman. Asked about what sets it apart from other products in the same line, Mark only says: “The industry is really saturated, to the tipping point, honestly. What sets ours apart is really in the secret formula.” It’s not magic, as far as I can tell, but the clients seem to think it is.

 

The industry is not just saturated with product lines. I ask Mark about his perspective on the positives and negatives of the barbering industry. The good, as he tells me, is the new ways in which people are collaborating and connecting. There is a camaraderie in the industry like there wasn’t before, and he feels social media has been a big push in that, as well as opportunities for more trainers to be introduced.

The bad is a subject we have discussed before in another interview. Mark feels the industry is years behind the American barbering industry in terms of licensing, expectations to be met and training in general. “It’s a gray area, and the training provided doesn’t always meet the expectations of the people who want to get into the industry. They need to know the expectations on them to be a barber.” He also brings up that he would like to see regulations finally get put in place in the interest of the client, the barbers themselves as well as sanitation standards.

Mark had been working with the “one size fits all” clipper before he got into American clippers. Even after that, he suffered the tell-tale noise from his attempts to power an Andis Masters without the Frequency60hz Converter. Now that he has one, his go to clippers feature the Oster Model 10 and the Oster FastFeed. His advice to anyone on the fence on American hair clippers or the Frequency60hz? “Try them all – find out which one is comfortable for you. Compared to the English ones, these gave me so many more options in terms of textures, styles, sharpness and power.”

 

What is next for Mark and the Groom Room Barbershop? With a laugh, he admits that he has been so busy with the holiday season that he hasn’t had a chance to sit down and plan out the year; he plans on doing it soon, though. As a final bit of advice to other barbers, Mark says: “Plan out your year. It’s important to take that time to strategize, because you’ll get caught up in the job or social media and those plans will fall apart if you aren’t careful.”

To everyone reading, I hope the plans for their years look good!

 

 

If you enjoyed this interview then don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, follow me on Instagram, and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email me at info@larrythebarberman.com. I also invite you to check out my blog at: WWW.60hz.me/grmark – The Frequency60hz defied what was a set cultural problem in the barbering industry; perhaps the future for barbers is in thinking outside the box.

 

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Luka The Barber Talks Barbering At Sandy Man ‘s Chop Shop Exeter

In Exeter, I sit down at a vintage little shop named Sandyman Chop Shop with Luka to hear is tale. Luka smiles and recounts his start in barbering, first and foremost: “I have my mum to thank for that. I was fourteen and desperate for a Saturday job. Of course, because of my age, I couldn’t really find work anywhere. One day, my mum and I were walking past a hairdressing shop and she suggested I should work there. I checked it out and initially was put off – I played a lot of rugby at the time and thought that sweeping up hair just wasn’t cool. Desperation won in the end and I went in and got the job. The more I worked around hair, the more I loved it; I knew what I wanted to do and that was that. I qualified as a hairdresser at eighteen and then moved on to barbering because it interested me a bit more.”

But why Sandyman Chop Shop as a home base, so to speak? Luka met the shop’s owner, Bones, some odd two years ago and there was no shop – simply a brand. Bones approached him to do all the shows at tattoo conventions as well as others and Luka fell in love with the concept. The fundamental idea was to eventually have a shop and Luka proposed to Bones that if he bought it, Luka would manage it. Since then, Sandy’s has been growing bigger and bigger and stays quite busy; Luka couldn’t be happier.

Sandy’s also boasts an interesting vintage style: skateboards, bikes, and vintage items line the walls and the shop in general. Asked about this, Luka answers: “It’s just us. We didn’t want people to come in here, comment on these things and have it there just because it looked nice. Bones, at forty, is still a skater, according to Luka. Luka himself is a bike person, having ridden bikes down mountains and done competitive BMX for most of his life. Tattoo culture is also a big part of the shop, if you couldn’t tell by the scissors near Luka’s eye. The shop is uniquely them, without question.

Luka expresses his signature style in almost exclusively doing skin fade poms; it is his most prominent service. However, he tells me that textured tops have been bringing back a lot of his hairdressing training recently. By spring, Luka predicts that the demand will more towards low tapers, though skin fades won’t vanish for some time. He expects the style to stay nice, clean and sharp bit with the hair a bit longer.

His input is one that is valuable, so much so that he was called to the London School of Barbering into one of the guest spots. He laughs when relating the story: “They have two locations and I wound up going to the wrong one – it was overwhelming. At least his friend got a good laugh out of trying to give him directions, though. Regardless, the London School of Barbering has asked him to come back in 2016 for another guest spot. As well as doing Barber Connect, Luka explains happily how proud he is of those moments and how he hopes to be doing more shows in the future.

Shows aren’t the only thing on his mind. There is also the matter of education and products. While Sandy’s does not have a product line in hair products right now, Luka does admit they have some things in the pipeline. They do, however, have some t-shirts, hoodies and hats for those looking for some great swag.

They also host a shaving course once per month and Luka tells me it has been very successful. Because of the tightness of the shop, they can only take on three students at a time. “I don’t do it personally,” Luka explains. “Bones and PJ handle the class, but I’ve been trying to get it worked out so that I can do hair cutting educational events sometime in the future.”

Charity is also a big part of Luka’s life. He works with the Lion’s Barber Collective a group of barbers gathered from around the country as well as Holland and Ireland and work with a charity called Papyrus that are dedicated to recognizing suicide in young people. “When you are with a barber, people often feel like they can open up and talk to us. Papyrus is all about being open to clients, and offering an environment and ear so that they feel that they can open up to their barbers. “You never know what is going on in their heads,” Luka explains. “And if we can identify why suicide happens and be a support system for those that need it, if we can be people’s friends, then we will have accomplished our goal.” He also makes a yearly visit with his dad to the Little Bridge House, a children’s hospice. Luka lost his brother, who used to spend time at the hospice before he passed. He and his dad take coloring books, last year it was a Wii, and catch up with the events and the staff each visit.

That is a big part of why Luka believes that Sandy’s, and he himself, are set apart from other shops and barbers. “It’s like going to see your doctor. You’re there with him for however long, and that is how I feel a barber should act towards their clients – just you and them. I don’t want to talk badly on other shops or barbers, obviously, but I think what makes us special is that we built a community here where people can come and hang out. Other businesses are very ‘get in, get out’ and money driven. It’s my people skills that set me apart. You can’t afford to have a big ego in this industry, honestly. More than ever, barbers are coming together to learn from one another and take inspiration. The downside is that social media has led to a lot of inflated egos – it goes to their heads, basically. Social media means I’m busy, but I don’t see it as a reflection of my work.”

With more shows, more guest appearances and more in the way of charity and education on his mind, Luka is setting forth in 2016 with a lot of big plans, including opening his own shop or shops, as it were. No matter where he goes, he is a shining example of the barbering community and how much good it can achieve.

If you enjoyed this interview then don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, follow me on Instagramhttp://www.instagram.com/larrythebarberman , and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email me at info@larrythebarberman.com.

 

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Competition Winning Barber Tariq Howes Talks Barbering

At Fadez Barber Shop Cardiff in Wales, I stop in to speak to barber Tariq Howes and get the scoop on his journey as a barber. Tariq is part of the exclusive group the Young Feds and has practiced as a competition barber in his decade long career.

Tariq started his journey after leaving school. Like many young school leavers, he was set out to look for a career path and his eyes set on barbering. “It just seemed like a cool place to work,” Tariq tells me. “You could socialize, the environment was great and it just seemed to be right for me.” That can-do attitude led him towards finishing up his education towards barbering and eventually he got a call back from a shop where he put in four years of hard work. “I learned if you work hard enough to even break your boundaries, you’ll get even more than where you want to be.”

The competitions would take him even further. “I ended up winning the Barber Bash and, with the Young Feds, you have to win in order to even join up. Competitions are outstanding when it comes to helping expand talent as well as progression in your career – I do it for those reasons over the money, for sure. Being part of the Young Feds has given me a lot of opportunities to compete, learn, and have a team where we can really just bounce ideas around and keep getting better.”

As for the Young Feds, Tariq had been following their journey for quite some time on social media. “Danny (Danny Robinson) and I – you know Danny – we had been speaking for quite some time on Instagram, and I had been following the journey of the Young Feds and his journey, in particular, for a long time. I thought they were superstars!” He laughs. It must feel fantastic to have risen through the ranks all the way to superstar! Though, Tariq is a modest sort, so I spared calling him as much. In fact, he talks a bit about how he feels that social media is especially important. “I used it to showcase some of my work and it really helped me actually believe that I am good at what I do.”

The award winning barber talks about his style and signatures when it comes to his cuts: “I’m partial to fades, really.” Goes with the shop name, for sure! “- when I had hair, I was working with a lot of afros and Asian styles. Honestly, I think it really depends on the area and what is common where your shop is located, but I like to do all kinds of hair: styles, colors, all of it. I started out doing flat tops and high fades with my Wahl Five Star Legends and it helped me work my way up towards being more professional with styles.”

Ah, another fan of American clippers! Tariq comments that he is more used to American clippers due to growing up around them. “I tried other clippers, but they never felt quite as powerful to me as the Five Star did; it helped me get where I am, so I almost feel like it has a special power to it.” He also notes that he likes using scissors frequently for most hair types, especially when it comes to afros and flat tops, as they give them that Tariq-patented look.

What does the future hold for the Young Fed? Tariq admits that he is focused on just staying a barber for now, before he shoots further for the stars. He enjoys being known for his particular style and approach. “Adam (Adam Solan) has got some stuff in the pipeline for the Young Feds, though,” he smiles. Fans of the Young Feds should be sure to keep an eye out.

With a decisive jump into barbering and the dedication to recognize his own talents and work hard to keep getting better, inside and outside of the competitive barbering world, Tariq is another great example of where hard work can land a barber if they’re willing to put in the time.

If you enjoyed this interview then don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, follow me on Instagram, and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email Larry at info@larrythebarberman.com.

 

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Sarah Of Fox And The Barber Hong Kong Talks Barbering

A nostalgic twist to an old interview of mine, I spoke with Sarah, the owner of the innovative Fox and the Barber located in scenic Hong Kong. Last time, I spoke with Alf about his experience moving out to Hong Kong and the differences between it and London. Sarah was the one that brought him out and had just as interesting of a tale as Alf did.

She got her start as a hairdresser in London, and wanted to steer towards working in the city. As it turned out, she found her perfect job working Monday to Friday in a barbershop, where she coincidentally met her husband. Sarah ended up falling in love with him, and barbering at the same time. “Men are very loyal,” she explains, “and very trusting. If you think something looks good, they are more likely to trust you, and it feels great knowing that I’ve helped them feel their best at the end of the day.” Her training comes from the Toni & Guy and Vidal Sassoon academy in London, but she also admits that she is largely self-taught when it comes to clippers. She also notes that she gets a lot of her inspiration from Instagram, and Oliver Kutz in London.

It is clear that she is an enterprising woman. She’s had experience in traditional barbershops in London as well as Hong Kong, at present. “I’m still learning,” she tells me. “I liked some things in these shops, and I’ve tried to recreate some of the things that I liked and do other things better. Fox and the Barber feels much like a classic London shop, and that is how I want it to feel – Alf contributes a lot to that.” For Sarah, she pays more attention to the people than to the looks of her shop overall. “It’s all about the people. The people you have in your shop are going to be what bring clients back for more, and that’s far more important to me.”

With her shop becoming more and more established in Hong Kong, I asked Sarah what she was looking to achieve within the next few years or so. “I’d like to continue to grow our clientele and bring in new customers, of course.” She smiles, “And have another barber or two, eventually.” Wink, wink to barbers looking for an adventure! Her plans also include more shops in Tokyo, London, Singapore, and she’d absolutely love to see Alf managing one of them at some point. Understandable – Sarah wears a lot of hats: mother, barber, manager, etc. If her plans go through on the education front, she’ll be wearing even more. “I’d like to open a school here at some point. Learning that I loved barbering was a major turning point for my life, and I want to play a part in helping others who want to become a barber. I want teachers who are entirely passionate, encourage talent and someone who will work hard.”

It seems like Sarah’s plan include a lot of new talent in the upcoming years. “I’d like to see some more imports, like Alf,” she laughs, “But it’d also be great to get local Chinese barbers in – I just want to have a mix that meshes with the team, has the skill to back themselves and can really add to the team.” Sarah is classically trained, which has proven to be in high demand in Hong Kong. She doesn’t have a favorite style or specialty. Instead, she explains that she loves all types of hair and people, and loves being able to leave her shop feeling great. “That really makes my day.” Sarah adds. She does some traditional shaves, largely just for Alf and her husband at present, but says she might get into doing more when she isn’t wearing so many hats.

Her ambitions are impressive alone, but she also tells me that she would like to eventually make a Fox and the Barber product line: pomades, razors and some super badger brushes. The product line used in the shop is already pretty impressive. They conduct shaves using Penhaligon products – Penhaligon noted for their classic style, and having actually approached Sarah to work with them on doing a signature shave using their products within the shop. They also use products from Baxter of California, Schorem, Truefitt and Hill aka as the oldest barbers in London, and D R Harris. With such an incredible line-up, it is clear that Sarah will have a lot of inspiration for her own product line when she gets started.

She and Alf both definitely have a lot of aspirations and, no doubt, big things coming their way. I can only hope that when they get there, I’ll be able to return and speak with both of them, as their journey into semi-uncharted territory for barbers is nothing short of inspiring.

If you enjoyed this interview then don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, follow me on Instagram, and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email Larry at info@larrythebarberman.com. I also invite you to check out my blog at: WWW.60hz.me/ihbar – The Frequency60hz defied what was a set cultural problem in the barbering industry; perhaps the future for barbers is in thinking outside the box.

 

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Barber: Marc Republic’s Interview With Larry The Barberman

Though his name is easily recognizable, Marc Republic distinguishes himself immediately with a humble story and a progressive attitude both towards barbering, education and what he believes will come next in either industry.

Marc started young: in eleventh grade, between sixteen to seventeen years of age, he got his start by studying cosmetology and managed to finish high school having acquired his license. Despite that, some five years later, he would also have accomplished getting his barber’s license and be working his way up towards a high demand for his services. “I wasn’t popular in school,” he admits, “and my African-American friends wouldn’t trust me to cut their hair, but my Caucasian and Asian friends did – they were more relaxed about it. By the time I got started, though, I had worked with all the different textures and ethnicities in terms of cutting and styling.” He reveals that, by the time he was seventeen, he was doing everything women’s hair and updos, but that by the time he got started in barbering he had gotten his diverse skillset sharp enough that he essentially got started as a professional straight away.

He might not have been popular then, but his shop and classes are certainly roaring now. When asked about the idea behind his shop, about what he was aiming for, Marc tells me that he wanted something “comfortable”. “I wanted everyone to feel welcome there, no matter the age, gender – all demographics. Everything is customized to give it that feeling, from old school barber chairs to old school lather machines, I really wanted to have a place where a grandfather, a son, the father, his wife – anyone, could feel welcome.” When I asked what he loved the most about barbering, he reflected the style of his shop perfectly. “My everyday clientele is the most satisfying part of it. Just seeing repeat customers who appreciate my skills and what I do, being the barber and stylist for generations of a family – that means the world.”

Asking him on what his greatest satisfaction after sixteen years of barbering, styling and educating people was, as a follow-up, his answer was: “Being able to give back. A lot of people get to where they are and they pretend like they did it all by themselves, with no help. I had lots of help getting here, and that is what I want to give back – that ability to help people get their licenses, to learn the skills they need to be successful cosmetologists or barbers; to give them the education that will get them started right out the door, basically.” Though his passion for giving back to the barbering and cosmetology communities was inspiring, I had to ask him his thoughts on UK based education for barbers. Marc gave me a little smile in response and answered, “They’re OK – a bit basic, but alright.” He stuck to his answer even when I told him that the UK doesn’t require licenses. “I designed a program that can get them licensed and taught the skills they need: barbering, advanced barbering, cutting, styling – all of that. You guys are good and all, but I made it so they can get advanced learning and practical training in the same go. I gauge their natural talents, try not to bore them with too much theory, and then I get them out there and get to work.”

Marc’s passion for education, his desire to help students obtain and train for their licenses and the care he has put into his desire to build himself, his brand and keep learning is a prime example of why I love being “the Barberman”.

What about his go-to style? Marc is a man of many trades, knowing how to cut and style for men and women alike. “Last year, on my birthday, I came to London,” he tells me, “and I took this weekend class because I try to aim to learn something new or educate myself on my birthday each year. I picked up the UK crop from it, and brought it back home with me – there were clients requesting comb-overs and I gave them the UK crop or fringe anyways!” A great choice, for sure. His reasoning behind it is that the UK crop or fringe is a style that calls for a lot of different tools and techniques at once. “It feels like a complete cut. You get to work with all different sorts of tools, show off these great textures – it’s just great.”

When I asked him about his tool kit, Marc admitted he was what he called a “fast-cutter”. “I work fast, I cut fast, even though I’m very meticulous about each one. I like to keep my station uncluttered and light, so I stick with my Andis BGR, Andis cordless outliners and a Wahl cordless super taper – I don’t have to worry about tripping over any cords and I can move around the shop fast and keep up my pace.” Marc adds that his Andis BGR is his every day, go-to clipper for bulk cuts and styles. When asked for his opinion on the Wahl Super Taper, he gave it a thumbs up. “If I had to take it with me, though, and plug it in in the UK, I wouldn’t have even been able to before the convertor you invented” he admits; shout-out to the Frequency60hz!

What’s next for the talented Marc Republic? “I’ll be hosting lessons again soon as well as an event at the end of October.” His words to the London School of Barbering? “Bring me in! Set something up!” He laughs, “I’d love to teach in London, really – live like a local for a month, too. I’m hoping to arrange something soon so I can do just that.” And what does Marc see coming on the horizon in general for the industry?

“The merging of cosmetology and barbering, for sure. I see Beattles’ style hairdos coming back in season for men, sort of a longer, natural look coming back –it comes full circle, you know? Back when that sort of do was popular, there were barbers who had no idea how to handle it. Shops were closing left and right; you gotta keep pushing your skills and educating yourself.” Marc advised. “Don’t be close-minded. Develop friendships and relationships with cosmetologists and get those skills ready, because the world is becoming a smaller place and so is the industry.”

Wise words from the educator extraordinaire. To those who want to see more of his work, check out his Instagram @marcrepublic and his site here: http://www.marcrepublic.com/.

For those interested in more information about using U.S hair clippers in foreign countries to achieve interesting new styles, check out the Frequency 60hz here: http://www.larrythebarberman.com

Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, and head over to Larry’s https://instagram.com/larrythebarberman and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email Larry at info@larrythebarberman.com

 

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Larry’s Interview With Jak The King Midas Apron Man

If you thought I put a lot of importance in excellent clippers, shears and tools, than you will be blown away by the barber who considers his tools more precious than gold. Jak, otherwise known as King Midas within the barbering industry, started his legacy of fashionable capes and aprons with a realization that his two biggest passions were fashion and barbering; to combine them seemed the best option.

Jak considered that there are many lanes in the barbering industry, and that he wanted to ultimately put something out there that hadn’t been done before. With his urban / hip-hop New York fashion sense and love for barbering, he eventually became King Midas, named after the man who turned everything he touched into gold.

Unlike the fairy tale character, Jak felt that his tools were already golden before he took on his new nickname. “Barbers don’t always live on the straight and narrow,” he admits, “and whenever my life started going a certain way, it was always my clippers and tools that kept me grounded and focused. When I finally wizened up, I realized how powerful and important my tools ultimately were: they provided my income, let me socialize with all sorts of great people and were therapeutic through every time in my life – they’re everything to me.”

With such importance placed on his tools, one wonders if they are actually made of gold (or just the expensive top-of-the-line models)? Jak takes a “not everything that is golden glitters” approach here as well. “My style is reflect in the tools I use – simplistic. They’re about the same ones that I’ve had since barbering school.” He smiles a bit, “My basic tool kit is my Andis Masters, the T-Outliner, the Oster 76 and shears. Sometimes, I use a Wahl, but these are the tools I largely stick with.” What is the style that his legendary tools reflect exactly? His love for passion displays as he admits that he uses an urban / hip-hop style, straight from New York itself, such as flat tops and skin fades.

Even with his nickname being King Midas, the quote on his store page is: “serve your clients like a peasant and they will honor you like a King.” His dedication reflects in how he tries to cater his products, the King Midas capes and aprons, to what barbers ultimately want. “There wasn’t much emphasis on anything more than the clippers,” he tells me. “I created the cape to bring more than that to the table, so that when barbers take pictures of their cuts and styles they can incorporate the capes which they can tailor to reflect them and the style of the shop.” The reception has been fantastic, and he is grateful for the positive feedback he has received.

When he introduced aprons to his product line, the feedback was a bit different. People weren’t initially receptive to aprons, as barber jackets are more of a common standard in the US. “Why go with aprons? I’m a traditional barber,” Jak laughs. “I’ve never gotten a response from a barber jacket, and even when we were using them at the barber academy I thought they were just too bland. I wanted to put something out there that offered more, and better fashion.” It took a bit of time, but the response has greatly improved since customers of his have begun to notice Jak wearing an apron with the King Midas logo. “They really comment a lot about how I’m color coordinated and how good it looks.” Jak hopes that more people will eventually see the passion he has put into the aprons as much as the capes.

Running a busy barber shop and distributing a popular line of products is a tall order – how can he do it? Jak admits that he’s been running on three or four hours of sleep for about two years, but he doesn’t regret the sacrifice of a better night’s sleep. “I’m basically working from the first thing in the morning to late at night, but I don’t mind. I want to be out there and interact with people so I can keep a pulse on what they want to see.  I design my products with them in mind and to show my gratitude – I think about them over anything else, even myself”.

Jak started with a bigger shop initially, but eventually downsized it to a smaller shop with six stations and six chairs. In another show of valuing simplicity and putting others first, he made the decision to make things more manageable and to lower any complications between the barbers and customers. “It’s worked so far,” he laughs.

His attitude towards the people he has made the capes and designs for has paid off in a big way. There are celebrities who have shown an interest in products from their own barbers and stylists putting on one of the capes or aprons on them. “It’s a lot! I want to thank the barbers who put the word out there by using one of my capes or aprons. Now, I’m inadvertently getting all of this love from celebrities who’ve never even met me.” With some of the names being 50 Cent and LeBron James, it is easy to understand how overwhelmed he might be, for certain. If there was one big name he would want wearing one of his products, Jak admits that he could die happy if President Obama was wearing one while he got a cut; nothing wrong with aiming high!

When asked what was next for him and King Midas as a whole when it came to new aprons and capes, Jak told me that he has three aprons on the way eventually. “There’s so much I want to do that, to be honest, I don’t even know what I want to do next for sure. Hopefully, people out there will think the wait is worth it, because I want to deliver something for them that shows that it is for them and to show my thanks.”

Check out some of his urban chic products at his online store, as well as his Facebook: jakpotkingmidas and his Instagram:@barbersarehiphop.

For those interested in more information about using U.S hair clippers in foreign countries to achieve interesting new styles, check out the Frequency 60hz here: http://www.larrythebarberman.com

Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, and head over to Larry’s https://instagram.com/larrythebarberman and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email Larry at info@larrythebarberman.com

 

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Larry’s Interview With The Man Behind Instagram @Barbershopconnect

 

 

 

Eric of @barbershopconnect is a social media master in the barbering industry, but in my interview with him at his hotel during Barber’s Lab, an event he hosted in London. I got the chance to hang out with the exceptionally cool Eric all day – in fact, I was his driver.

 

So, how did the social media King get started? “With a slow shop,” he admitted with a laugh. “Back then, I was using Facebook much the same way as everyone else – looking at ex-girlfriend’s pages. Then I started to see all of these barbers who were super involved with Facebook, and they were better than me. I started stealing their haircuts to put on my page to show how good these guys were, and suddenly everyone was coming to me to see other barbers work. That started back in the days of Myspace, and that’s where it all started.”

 

With half a million followers on Instagram alone, Eric’s simple beginnings on social media are excellent evidence of working your way up to something greater. Though, I had to ask him, how does he have any time for barbering? Eric responded that he had a chair in his house that he moved that was free, and initially, his friends would come over to raid his fridge and he would give them cuts there. After he got tired of his food being eaten, Eric gave away the chair for free as well. Now, he admits he doesn’t really do cuts for anyone anymore. “It’s a 24 hour job just maintaining posts – from the time I wake up to when I go to bed, I’m posting from my phone all day.”

 

Maintaining his incredibly high number of posts and content is understandably time consuming. I followed up by asking him what his style was when he was still actively barbering. Eric responded, “I started out learning from my friend, so we were just competing in the shop, trying to be better than the guy next to you. With social media coming along, now there was a higher amount of people to compete against and push you to better your skills.”

 

Eric didn’t get to where he is now just on pure luck, of course. When it comes to deciding what to repost on Instagram, he has a set strategy. “It’s not always about the best haircut. Sometimes, I focus on things that are interesting and will get people talking. Like when I posted a South Style Fade, people were asking what on Earth the style was and questioning my choice, but that style is huge in Texas!” He laughs, “I just think it’s so cool how all these styles from around the world can come together.”

 

“Can you give some ninja tricks for people looking to increase their Instagram following?” I asked. Eric grinned, “My tricks? Timezones, for one. Whether it is people who just got off work or woke up in the morning and grab their phones. I mean, it’s called social media, so you gotta socialize! Don’t be silent – people love when you respond to them, and that’s what it is all about, having a conversation.” When it comes to the best time-zones to post content on Instagram, he advised: “2pm in New York is 10am in L.A; L.A is big on social media, so I try to post then. I try to hit 10am in every time-zone, especially to the big three for the market, New York, L.A and London.”

 

Eric doesn’t just post to Instagram, of course. Like most social media gurus, he takes advantage of multiple platforms: Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, etc. “Snapchat though,” he chuckles, “that’s more a platform for sixteen year olds, so not as big on that one. Instagram is for us middle ages and so, Facebook – your grandma, your aunt are on it. No one wants to be on Facebook anymore because it’s for old people!” Blunt, for sure. What about products? “We have some T-shirts and some basic stuff right now, but we’re working on it,” Eric tells me.

 

The event that provided me the opportunity to hang out with Eric was a fantastic one, for sure. When asked about what the purpose behind his Show Case Barber Lab was, he explained, “I just wanted to come over here to meet people in person that I really admire. They’re seeing the fade game online, and barbers are seeing the kind of cuts we’re posting about here in China. Now, people are wanting cuts from all over, and it is really building up our culture to the entire world. People from all over are PMing me from all over to show their work! It’s crazy to me – they’re coming from places I had never even considered before. It’s a blessing, really.”

 

So, what is next for Barber Shop Connect? Eric stated he wants to see more of his culture spread worldwide. “I love the states, I love New York, but I want to physically meet people and spread that culture. I want to see the world. The best thing about barbering is that I can go on vacation and meet people in person everywhere.”

 

I know that I am just as excited to see barbering culture spread worldwide, and it is one my personal goals to travel and meet barbers from all over as well. I don’t know if I’ll meet anyone who is like Eric, however.

 

To keep up with what he is doing, follow his Instagram @barbershopconnect.

Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel for more, and head over to Larry’s https://instagram.com/larrythebarberman and http://www.facebook.com/larrythebarberman pages for other free barbering content. You can also email Larry at info@larrythebarberman.com

 

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